How To Make Parts (part one)

I first realized the importance of page turns when I was a sophomore in college. I was auditioning for a chamber music honors concert with Elliott Carter’s Esprit Rude/Esprit Doux II, and all three members of the ensemble were playing from the score instead of from the provided parts (a wise move with that piece). Since we were all around 19 years old, no one had a better idea than to just tape several pages together at a time and then discard them to the floor when the time came. Before we could finish the last bar, a judge said to us “you can play in the concert but only if you do something about the page turns.” I still see people throwing 4 or 5 taped-together pages to the ground during performance regularly, and it is one of my biggest pet peeves (along with the old fortress of music stands trick that wind players seem to enjoy so much, but really just makes their performance look like watching something download.)

In the decade I’ve spent playing mostly contemporary music, I rarely receive a part or score that I can perform from without altering it in some way. I’ve toyed with various solutions over the years, from cutting and pasting music on to poster board to binding loose pages together with masking tape. In part 2 of this post I’ll detail one of those processes, and later will explain my newest solution which I think is a keeper.

Not to state the obvious, but the best solution to this problem would be for composers, copyists, and publishers to see to it that the parts they give to performers actually work. Every minute I spend making a new part is a minute I don’t spend actually practicing a piece. This is especially important advice for student composers. The quickest way to make an enemy out of someone performing your piece is to give them a part they can’t play from. No one is expecting the next Pierrot Luniere to come out of a conservatory undergrad, but as long as the printed music itself is prepared on a professional level, the experience should be positive. This first of three posts on this topic will address common pitfalls of music copying.

1. Don’t use landscape layout

For the life of me, I can’t comprehend why so many composers insist on using landscape (horizontal) page formatting. It causes many problems:

  • Landscape layout necessitates more music stands. If using ledger sized paper (11×17), one sheet occupies the space of the entire music stand. If in portrait layout (vertical), two sheets of ledger paper fit on one stand.
  • It is easier to move one’s neck and eyes up and down than it is from side to side.
  • Landscape layout puts the extreme sides of the music further away from a stationary performer.

(Update: John McDonald wisely pointed out that landscape format works well for piano parts, since the piano’s built in music stand isn’t tall enough to support portrait layout in most paper sizes.) 

2. Insert page breaks in convenient spots in the music

Don’t worry about leaving half of a page blank or inserting a completely blank page if that is what it takes to make the page turns work. In the last month I have played pieces by students and professionals alike where no thought whatsoever was put in to the page breaks. I wish I didn’t have to state the obvious again, but:

  • Musicians can not turn pages in the middle of a rapido passage.
  • Percussionists can not turn pages in the middle of a roll.
  • Page turns should be avoided during dramatic pauses in music.

3. Mind the gaps

I’m referring here to the distance between staves. This can make the difference between legible and illegible. I recently performed a 35 page part that easily could have been around 20 pages if not for the 40% negative space per page. A later post will address Berio’s Circles, which contains more blank paper than any piece of music should.

4. Consider whether or not performers should work from parts or scores

Factors that determine whether a performer would perform from a score include the size of the ensemble and thus the amount of music possible on one page of full score, and whether or not a piece will be conducted. When dealing with complicated music for small unconducted chamber group, I prefer to play from a score with my line on top and the other instruments miniaturized below. If performers prefer scores, you should still prepare different page breaks for each musician if necessary.

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2 thoughts on “How To Make Parts (part one)

  1. Jennifer Bewerse

    All very well put and true. I might add to the landscape 11×17 critique that measure numbers are so far apart that a huge amount of rehearsal time is spent just trying to locate the measure the conductor (or other performer) is talking about. I played a contemporary opera recently that fell victim to that problem – with only 3 rehearsals you can bet we didn’t have a minute to spare…

    Reply

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